Fanny Penny

In This Collection

Other Works by Fanny Emily Penny (1847–1939)

  • Caste and Creed. London: White, 1890.
  • Chowra’s revenge. London: Hutchinson, 1937.
  • Dark corners. London: Chatto and Windus, 1908.
  • Desire and delight. London: Chatto and Windus, 1919.
  • Diamonds. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1920.
  • The elusive bachelor. London: Hutchinson, 1935.
  • The familiar stranger. London: Hutchinson, 1936.
  • A forest officer. London: Methuen, 1900.
  • Get on the wooing. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1931.
  • The inevitable law. London: Chatto and Windus, 1907.
  • Jackals and others. London: Mills and Boon, 1939.
  • Living dangerously. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1925.
  • Love by an Indian river. London: Chatto and Windus, 1916.
  • Love in a palace. London: Chatto and Windus, 1915.
  • Love in the hills. London: Chatto and Windus, 1913.
  • A love tangle. London: Chatto and Windus, 1917.
  • Magic in the air. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1933.
  • The Malabar magician. London: Chatto and Windus, 1912.
  • Missing. London: Chatto and Windus, 1917.
  • The old dagoba. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1934.
  • On the Coromandel coast. London: Smith Elder, 1908.
  • One of the best. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1923.
  • Patrick. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1934.
  • Pulling the strings. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1927.
  • A question of colour. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1926.
  • A question of love. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1928.
  • The rajah’s daughter. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1921.
  • The romance of a nautch girl. London: Swan Sonnenschein, 1898.
  • Sacrifice. London: Chatto and Windus, 1910.
  • The sanyasi. London: Chatto and Windus, 1904.
  • A spell of the devil. London: Hutchinson, 1935.
  • The swami’s curse. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1922.
  • Treasure, love and snakes. London: Mills and Boon, 1938.
  • The two brides. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1929.
  • The wishing stone. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1930.

Fanny Emily Penny was born in Covehithe, England, the daughter of the Rev. John Farr and Emily Caroline Cobbold. Her great uncle was novelist Richard Cobbold. In 1877, she married the Rev. Frank Penny and the couple moved to Madras, India. They had two children, a son and a daughter. While in India, Penny contributed articles on Indian life for the Madras Mail. In 1888, the couple moved to the Nilgiri Hills. It was there that Penny met novelist Bithia Mary Croker who encouraged Penny in writing fiction. She wrote over thirty books, many of which included Indian characters and settings. Early in the twentieth century, the family moved to Ealing. Her husband wrote a history, The Church in Madras (1904). He died in 1928 and she died in 1939 in Ealing.